Monthly Archives: October 2016

The Lost Girls

 

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The Lost Girls

by Heather Young

WM Morrow | 2016
Hardcover: 352 pages
ISBN: 978-0-06-245660-1
Genre: Fiction/Suspense

Hardcover ARC won from LibraryThing/Early Readers and  ARC e-reader from Edelweiss in exchange for an unbiased review.

★★★★★

Wow!

It has been a long time since I picked up a book that I read straight through the night and I was invested in the characters deeply enough to cry at the end. And to think this was the author’s first book!

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I found this notebook in the desk yesterday…It was as though it had lain in wait…until now … sixty-four years [later]. Since Lilith’s passing…the story of that summer has been mine alone, to keep or to share. I am the last…I hold secrets that don’t belong to me…Better to let it be, I tell myself…But this notebook reminds me that it’s not so simple as that…So I will write my family’s story, here in this book … I will tell it as fully as I can, even the parts that grieve me…Lucy Evans

Lucy Evans’ great-grandfather, leaving the coal mines of Wales, arrived in America, and improved his status eventually co-founding Williamsburg, Minnesota. The Lost Girls covers five generations of women in this prominent family. Lucy’s family, along with six other Williamsburg families, owned a summer retreat on a remote lake. A local mixed-race family owned a restaurant and lodge that was central to the social life of the lake residents. In the fall of 1935, as the temporary residents on the lake prepare to head back to town in advance of the harsh Minnesota winter, Lucy’s six-year old sister, Emily, disappears in the dead of night. Lucy’s distraught and overprotective mother never returns to Williamsburg and she, along with the two remaining sisters, stay at the lake- always leaving the light on for Emily.

Sixty-four years later, Lucy, the last of the Thomas Evans family still lives at the lake, and knowing she will soon be gone, decides it’s time to tell her family’s story…warts and all.  Lucy leaves the Evans estate to her grandniece, Justine, along with the notebook revealing all the family’s dirty secrets.

The book alternates from Lucy’s first person narration with the third person narrator focusing on the life of Lucy’s grandniece, Justine after Lucy’s death.  As Lucy shares her story we begin to see how the sins of the past generations have deeply scarred Justine’s life in the present.

Lucy’s story is so compelling that Justine’s story seems weak at first but as the book progresses Justine’s family issues become as important as the search for the truth about Emily’s disappearance. As the two stories converge, putting the book down is nearly impossible!

The novel is emotionally hard at times. The isolation, loneliness and emotional distress of each character is palpable. Both Lucy and Justine’s family secrets are slowly revealed but you can still feel them viscerally just below the surface from beginning to end. Would the story have changed if each succeeding generation not borne only girls? What draws each of the girls to a toxic spouse? Is there a way to save Justine and her girls?

The book is so well written that it is hard to believe it’s the author’s first work of fiction! The descriptions of the lake and the woods make you feel as though you are witnessing things through three-D glasses. Lucy’s penchant for writing children’s books about Emily are works of art in themselves. There are so many layers to this book but the reader never gets lost in the story; just hungry to know more…Love, loyalty, friendship and family bonds are tested and the conclusion of the book will leave you stunned.

Highly recommended.

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Clancys of Queens

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by Tara Clancy

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Hardcover: 256 pages
Crown Publishing | 2016
ISBN: 978-1-101-90311-7
Genre: Personal Memoir

★★★★☆

Print ARC won via LibraryThing/Early Readers and e-copy via Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased honest review.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Recipe For Self-Deprecating
Coming-Of-Age Memoir

Take one five-year old Irish-Italian school girl from New York City (Queens) with the energy of the “Roadrunner” and the mischievous bent of “Wile E. Coyote”; a self identified whirling dervish with a penchant for mayhem.

Pass her around Queens like an invitation to a “progressive dinner”.

Start her out weekdays in the care of her Italian grandparents, Rosalie and “Ricky” Riccobono and their geriatric relatives and neighbors on 251st Street in Bellerose, Queens. Indulge her free spirit and fill her days with love and a generous dose of Rosalie’s Italian salty invectives.

[I enter the kitchen and sneak up on Grandma as she is about to tell me to do something.] I’m a few feet below Grandma’s sight line…her head slowly swiveling left, then right, then left again with a fixed, fuming gaze, looking like a cyborg in a housedress. Right before her eyes start pulsing red and she turns real-life Terminator, her head tilts down and there I am, standing at her heels and choking down a laugh…[She starts her instructions as she always does with her favorite opening cussword. She means nothing by it, it’s just her catch-all punctuation.]

Weekday evenings hand her over to her loving and patient mother for the quiet solitude of each other’s company. As quiet as life can be with a dervish in the house.

Two weekends a month gift her to her caring father, a dirt-poor Irish-American police officer and his pull out sofa bed in his one-room converted boat shed near Jamaica Bay. Saturday evenings, the two sit high above the crowd in the Crow’s Nest at Gregory’s Bar and Restaurant in Broad Channel, Queens collecting treats and high fives from the regulars.

ps133-logoThe other two weekends place her in the back of a stretch limo, alone, to arrive at the luxurious Bridgehampton estate of her mother’s boyfriend. Incongruously parked at the formal entrance of the main house is her plastic electric Power Wheels pickup charged and ready for her first tour of the estate grounds.

Stir together blending all characters into one big extended family that protects, loves and supports our little dervish as she crashes and blasts her way through grade school, middle school and into high school. Tara goes through schools like Imelda Marcos does shoes.

Tara tells her story as if she is riding the subway sharing anecdotes over time to a seatmate. Each story awash in a fresh memory that exposes more of herself not deeply but openly and often with humor. Along the way we learn a lot about Queens and meet some wonderful people with colorful nicknames such Uncle Jelly, Mumbling Joe and Jimmy the Hat. (Wait until you meet Rosemary. Sorry no hints. Won’t spoil the surprise.)

The story is not all fun and games. She openly shares her darker issues such as alcohol abuse and the struggle for sexual identity but she always finds a way to tell it with tongue-in-cheek humor. In true New York style everything and everyone feels larger than life but the overall emotion that rings through the clatter and clutter is unconditional love. Tara has a way of expressing her love for her parents, grandparents and extended family in all her stories that makes you want to head to Grandma Rosalie’s for Christmas dinner.

Believe me you are in for a surprise when you read what turns her life around at the end!

Recommended.

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Night Watch

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NIGHT WATCH

 by Iris and Roy Johansenblood-splatter4-md

St. Martin’s Press 2016
Hardcover: 352 pgs
978-1250075970
Kendra Michaels #4


★★★☆☆

 

ARC e-book from publisher via edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

genre-mystery

format_quoteAbduction?…I have to let them find me…If I can’t talk you out of this, I’m going to go over possibilities you might fact in captivity…I learned a lot while I was being held by the Taliban…Kendra sat down opposite her at the table. I’m listening…

Iris Johansen started her literary career with straight up romance fiction evolving into the historical romance vein; I am allergic to the romance genre so I avoid them preferring something more rough and tumble. When I read the synopsis of Night Watch, I learned Johansen had turned her talents to crime fiction. I was happy to receive an advanced reader e-book from the publisher via Edelweiss so I could preview this genre change for myself.

Night Watch is the fourth book in the Kendra Michaels series and I was concerned it would leave me at a disadvantage in Kendra’s back history. It turns out this newest book has flashbacks, including details about Kendra’s blindness and the miracle experimental surgery that restored her sight, that makes this book a stand alone work. During her sightless years, Kendra developed extraordinary abilities of smell and hearing. Born with an insatiable curiosity, she uses the miracle of sight along with her overly developed senses to see the world more intimately and acutely than Sherlock Holmes. Her observational and cognitive skills are often used by law enforcement in crime scene investigations.

This newest mystery centers on the disappearance of the doctor that restored the teenage Kendra’s vision. Kendra, ever grateful and loyal to a fault, makes the search for the missing doctor her life’s mission.  As the story picks up steam some very quirky characters including a young former military female private investigator and a sexy and wealthy former FBI agent help her in the search. The obligatory bad guys are really bad and you just know they are going to get their comeuppance in the end.

The first half of the story was kind of ho-hum to me but when things did start to develop I couldn’t put the book down.  Yet in the end, I am not sure I liked Kendra. I couldn’t see what the playboy FBI agent saw in her to make him fly around the world to help her. Just because something is fictional and suspends belief doesn’t mean they have to come across like Flat Stanley; they could have a little more character development.

It was a comfortable read on a night where I needed a quick read that didn’t strain the brain. I will admit that I read well past my bedtime to finish it.  So I guess in the end I would recommend it as a place filler between a heavy non-fiction and your next epic novel.

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Banned Book Week

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Celebrating the Freedom to Read:
September 25 – October 1, 2016

Banned Books Week is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read…[It] highlights the value of free and open access to information. Banned Books Week brings together the entire book community; librarians, booksellers, publishers, journalists, teachers, and readers of all types, in shared support of the freedom to seek and to express ideas, even those some consider unorthodox or unpopular.

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http://www.ala.org/bbooks/bannedbooksweek

I was naive as child to assume I could have access to any book I wanted to read as soon as I was able to read it.  Back in the dark ages of the 1950’s, I thought I was a real big shot when I mastered Fun With Dick and Jane. It wasn’t until high school that I learned that some books offend some people and those people didn’t think I should make my own reading choices.

The American Library Association’s Office of Information Freedom began collecting data about challenged and banned books in 1990 and that list of 20,000+ is just the tip of the iceberg – it doesn’t include unreported challenges.

If you want to see a list of the most popular titles listed by challenge reasons, visit the link to the ALA in the graphic above.

Each year, I choose a title from the latest list of challenges and read it for myself. This year’s selection is:

LOOKING FOR ALASKA

by John Green.

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AWARDS
ALA Best Book for Young Adults
Top 10 ALA Quick Pick for Reluctant Young Readers
2005 Booklist Editors’ Choice
Kirkus Best Book of 2005
2005 School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age

CHALLENGE REASONS

Offensive Language
Sexually Explicit
Unsuited for Age Group

 

New York Dutton | 1st Ed. 2005
Hardcover: 350 pages
Genre: Fiction
Audience: Secondary School (High School)

Stayed tuned for my review and thoughts in the coming weeks. If you choose  to read a title from the banned books list I would love to hear about it!

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