Monthly Archives: July 2017

The Woman in Cabin 10

THE WOMAN IN CABIN 10

by RUTH WARE

Gallery/Scout Press:  2016
Hardcover: 368 pages
ISBN: 978-1501132933
Genre: Murder Mystery

Review Source: ARC e-book from Netgalley

★★★☆☆

Woman in Cabin 10 is an Agatha Christie style murder mystery on a tiny cruise ship heading into the frigid waters of Norway. It is summer here in north Georgia and the pea soup humidity and oppressive heat have me heading to my recliner with a glass of ice tea. I need an ocean breeze to cool things off. Ready, set, read. When I finished, I felt somewhat disappointed about the ending but nonetheless enjoyed the book.

Laura “Lo” Blacklock, a budding travel journalist, is one of a handful of invited passengers on the tiny luxury cruise ship, the Aurora Borealis, as she sets out on her maiden voyage to Norway. The Aurora, small in stature with only 10 luxury suites, has full cruise line amenities and service staff. The Northern Lights Company and its director, Lord Richard Bullmer, hope to find interested investors and to earn complimentary publicity to further the Aurora’s niche market.

Lo’s apartment is burglarized while she is home just before the launch. The home invasion serves no other purpose than to start the story out on edge. We learn that Lo suffers from life-long panic attacks and chronic insomnia that she treats with antidepressants and copious amounts of alcohol. Despite the untimely severe flare of her panic attacks, Lo heads to the ship self-medicated and hung-over – desperate for sleep. Can you spell C-r-a-n-k-y?

Cabin #9 has been reserved for Lo. As she dresses for dinner she discovers she has forgotten her mascara. Hearing movement next door, she hopes she can get a tube from the resident of Cabin #10. A young woman, dressed casually, answers abruptly, hands a tube of mascara to Lo, and slams the door.

Later that first night, Lo hopes to meet the mystery woman at dinner. The remaining key characters (aside from the crew) in this who-dunnit-it glide, elegantly adorned, one by one into the small formal dining room.  There are two tables arranged to seat 12 people. The one empty seat, Lo surmises, is meant for the mystery woman in cabin #10 who has chosen to skip the meal.

Late one night, Lo hears a scream and the sound like something heavy hitting the water. She races to her small balcony and sees what she believes to be blood on the balcony next door and a hand disappearing into the deep. She rings for security and relays what she has seen and heard. A search is conducted but no one, crew or passenger, is found missing.

Unable to get anyone to believe there is a mystery woman aboard the ship and she was murdered, Lo sets out on her own to find clues. The harder she tries to raise the alarm, the more everyone points to her prescribed drug use, insomnia and heavy drinking to discredit her claims. Yet, someone knows what happened! And they let Lo know she was right. The mystery for the reader becomes- Who is warning Lo to “stop digging”?

The climax of the story seemed to me to have too many loose ends. As the story ramps up in the final pages,what was intended to be tension and suspense felt more like chaos and strange. Too many unconnected events. The story could have been improved with fewer characters and more attention to details but overall a quick and easy read.

Most importantly, as expected, the murderer is disclosed..or were they?

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Sometimes I’m So Smart I Almost Feel Like A Real Person

SOMETIMES I’M SO SMART I ALMOST FEEL LIKE A REAL PERSON

by Graham Parke

No Hope Media | 2017
Paperback
ISBN: 978-9491919039
Genre: Fiction / Millennials / Social Angst

Review Source: Kindle copy provided by the author in exchange for my honest review

★★★★☆

A lot has happened since you left, Eric.

For one thing, I had to deal with this really bad break up. Not one to waste time, I immediately turned to my oldest and dearest friend: Google. After…countless generations suffered this fate before me…[all searching] for the best way to deal with the rejections, the heartache, and that longing to spend the days with [The One], it should be known by now.

Not so.

…opening paragraph in the preface

First off, I loved this book.

As Harold begins to describe his story, it is obvious from the get-go that it’s going to be somewhat of a Debbie-Downer.  However, the author has found a way to make loneliness and love-sickness amusing and entertaining. The book is written in a funny self-deprecating style and has the reader flipping pages to see what emotional hole Harold will dig for himself next.

Harold is a 30 year-old socially challenged accountant who still lives with his mother. Together they share a raucous relationship tempered with love. They rarely see eye-to-eye on anything. His mother is fond of reminding him that it is her house. Harold is quick to point out that he pays rent like any boarder and expects his privacy. Sparks fly and doors slam. The house creaks with secrets that neither one wants to admit are there.

Mom recognizes that Harold has social issues and presses him to date or make friends but goes about it in all the wrong ways. Yet her interference does reap rewards in its own way. Here’s one of my favorite lines:

“When I arrive [home from work], Mom’s already complaining. Sometimes I think she starts before she even opens the door, perhaps warming up by telling the wall to stop slouching and stand up straight.”

The failure to find the answer to his love-sick blues on Google leads Harold to set up his own YouTube video blog.  He first calls it: How to get over someone in 600 easy steps. After reflection he changed it to 27 simple steps to happiness.  Each carefully scripted message is a 5 minute vblog narrated anonymously by disguising his face with a Zorro mask and adopting the online name of Leverage.

Despite his hope to spread his “wise-isms” anonymously, he is discovered by several of his followers. Each discovery leads Harold down another road less traveled in his life. One of his followers, using his “wise-isms” becomes a rival to Harold’s best hope for love. The charming and flirtatious sales clerk, Emma, at the Ye Olde Peanut Shoppe strings Harold along by tweeting all day but giving him the Heisman when pressed for a real date. He becomes so obsessed with Emma that he begins imaginary dialogues with her.

Harold’s wild emotional roller coaster relationship with Emma goes from heart pounding infatuation to friendship fatigue. He eventually finds out about her boyfriend and the futility of his hopes. When she continues to text he begins weaning himself away from her.

So that was Part One of my story, Eric.

I hope you understand why I had no choice but to divert all mental resources away from “attracting The One” and on to something much more important.

There’s less snark and more heartfelt substance in Part Two. He has discovered that what he felt for Emma was just a pipe-dream. Now having cleared his mind of mischief he faces several issues in his life that were in limbo. If I elaborate, it would be a spoiler. Best you find out things for yourself. The tone becomes more serious but no less engaging.

The book ended with a few loose threads but not enough to detract from my overall enjoyment. Aside from the quirky repartees, I liked that Harold “found himself”.

Recommended to any reader who love quirky and comical characters.

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