Monthly Archives: August 2017

Watch Me Disappear

WATCH ME DISAPPEAR

by JANELLE BROWN

★★★☆☆

IT’S A GOOD DAY, or maybe even a great one, although it will be impossible to know for sure later. By that point they’ll already have burnished their memories of this afternoon, polished them to a jewel-like gleam. One of the last days …before Billie died…

Spiegal & Grau | 2017
Hardcover: 368 pages
ISBN: 978-0-8129-8946-5
Genre: Fiction/Mystery/Missing Persons
Review Source: ARC e-book from Netgalley

Billie and Jonathan Flanagan have been married for 16 years and have reached that stage in their relationship where things have gone stale. Billie rejuvenates herself by trekking in the mountains alone or with a friend. The time comes for a little more “me” time, and she announces she is going alone to a remote section of the Pacific Crest Trail for a few days.

When she doesn’t return, a search discovers her broken phone and a lone hiking boot off the trail. After a lengthy search, she is presumed dead.

A year later, their daughter, Olive, begins to have visions of her mother in various settings that seem to imply her mother is not dead but waiting somewhere to be found. Olive’s erratic behavior and frequent unexcused absences jeopardizes her attendance at an expensive private high school. Some feel it is delayed grief with the anniversary of her mother’s death and others believe she has a medical problem. She is convinced she is a psychic.

Billie cannot be declared officially dead for a year which has left Jonathan in limbo financially. Without a death certificate he cannot receive the life insurance benefits. Shortly before Billie’s death Jonathan had quit his job to follow his dream of writing a book. Now, a year later, without his wife’s income, Jonathan is struggling to pay the bills that include the expensive private school tuition for Olive.

Jonathan has begun the court directed process of “proving” his wife is not dead. In the search through the family’s financial records he discovers secrets his wife has hidden from him. As he peels back the layers of her deception, he discovers a secret life before their marriage.

The mishmash of issues including Olive’s “visions”, financial woes, Billie’s secrets, and Jonathan’s weak-kneed personality seemed so directed and contrived but overall I consider it a nice simple read. If you excuse my vulgarity, the purview of an old woman, I wished Jonathon would grow a pair.

It will come as no spoiler that Billie is still alive, but the reasons why will be a surprise. The ending did make me say, “How about that”. If you are looking for a book with a simple plot that you can take with you to read at the car service center, here you go.

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A Stranger In The House

A STRANGER IN THE HOUSE

by SHARI LAPENA

When they brought you in[to the hospital], you were very disoriented, he begins. Saying things.

She’s anxious now, and wide awake. You kept saying someone’s name over and over. Do you remember that?

She goes completely still. No.

Pamela Dorman | Aug 2017  
Hardcover: 320 pages
ISBN: 978-0735221123
Genre: Mystery/Amnesia/Murder
Review Source: ARC e-book from Eidelweiss

★★☆☆

BLOGGER’S NOTE

I was thrilled when the publisher through Eidelweiss granted permission to preview the book. I didn’t notice when I downloaded it that  a large portion of the book was missing and replaced by strange coding. Always up to a challenge, I decided to see if I could decipher what was going on despite the screwed-up download.

Amazingly, it wasn’t hard at all. The number of characters were few and one-dimensional. The plot fairly obvious from the get-go. The dialogue simple, much like a Robert Parker novel. In other words, an easy read. I do want to note that I rated it only 2 stars but I do so with the caution that I didn’t get the full book to review.

REVIEW

Tom Krupp arrives home from work to discover his wife is not there. Their evening meal is laid out in the kitchen. He notes her purse and cell phone are on the counter. Her car is missing. All very strange and very much unlike Karen’s daily routine.

He begins to call their neighbors to ask if they know Karen’s whereabouts. After a few hours he calls 911 to report his wife missing. His doorbell rings within minutes of this call. Opening his door, he is surprised to find police officers standing there. How did you get here so fast? I just called 911 a few minutes ago.

His wife has been hospitalized after crashing her car into a pole while driving recklessly through traffic. Mysteriously the accident occurred in the unsavory side of town. What was she doing there and what would make her drop everything and head there?

As Karen lies in the hospital struggling to remember what happened, the police discover a murder was committed in an abandoned building near the scene of the accident. Despite their best efforts to make her talk, Karen insists she has no recollection of why she left her home in such a hurry or why she was running scared; scared enough to make her nearly kill herself behind the wheel. The nondescript detectives return time and time again badgering Tom, Karen and Brigid hoping to pin the murder on someone.

Karen’s best friend, Brigid, shows herself to be is a devious conniver who has spend the last two years watching everything that happens across the street in the Krupps household. And poor Tom finds his own past rears up to bite him. The ending is creative and does have an unusual twist.

Truth be told, I didn’t really like any of these characters. Not that it is important that I develop a fondness for the accused, but I don’t like it when I don’t care what happens to any one of them.

Judging from the wild range of ratings by other reviewers, this book either satisfies a mystery appetite or leaves folks with a yawn. Personally, I like a book that has me looking for clues so I can outsmart the author and happy when I am caught off guard and shouting in the end…I didn’t see that coming! Yawn, figured this one out early.

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One Thousand White Women

One Thousand
White Women:

The Journals of May Dodd

Jim Fergus, Author

Rated: ★★★★★

I’ve been hooked from childhood on fiction and non-fiction survival stories after reading Last of the Mohigans by James Fenimore Cooper.

I knew almost immediately that One Thousand White Women would be a book that I would read and reread. It is harsh, heartbreaking, and cruel yet depicts loyalty, friendship, love and strength of character. It reveals the truth that all cultures have good and bad elements capable of extreme behaviors and actions in the interest of their individual survival.

I highly recommend reading One Thousand White Women if you enjoyed the book and/or movie of Dances with Wolves.

The author states, “In spite of efforts to convince the reader to the contrary, this book is entirely a work of fiction. [T}he seed. . . was sown in author’s imagination by an actual historical event: in 1854 at a peace conference. . . a Northern Cheyenne chief requested. . .the gift of one thousand white women as brides for his young warriors.” [T]he request collapsed the peace conference, , , and the brides were not sent. In this novel, the brides were sent.

May Dodd was incarcerated by her parents in a mental institution for the crime of bearing two illegitimate children and loving a man far beneath her station in life . Escaping the horrors of the institution, May joins in the first convoy of brides and begins documenting her new life in a journal with the hopes that her estranged children “might one day know the truth of my unjust incarcertation, my escape from Hell, and into whatever is to come in these pages.”

I am currently reading an advanced copy of The Vengeance of Mothers, a sequel to One Thousand White Women, that will be available in September of 2017.

In September of 1874, the great Cheyenne “Sweet Medicine Chief” Little Wolf made the long overland journey to Washington, D.C., with a delegation of his tribesmen for the express purpose of making a lasting peace with the whites. . . The Indian leader was received in Washington with all the pomp and circumstance accorded to the visiting head of state of a foreign land.

At a formal ceremony in the Capitol building with President Ulysses S. Grant, and members of a specially appointed congressional commission, Little Wolf was presented with the Presidential Peace Medal. . . Expressing himself through an interpreter. . .Little Wolf came directly to the point.

“It is the Cheyenne way that all children who enter this world belong to their mother’s tribe. .  . The Cheyennes  are a small tribe, we have never been numerous because we understand that the earth can only carry a certain number of the People. . . . Because of the sickness you have brought us . . .and the war you have waged upon us, we are now even fewer. Soon the People will disappear altogether, as the buffalo in our country disappear.

“I am the Sweet Medicine Chief. My duty is to see that my People survive. To do this we must enter the white man’s world-our children must become members of your tribe. Therefore we ask the Great Father for the gift of one thousand white women as wives, to teach us and our children the new life that must be lived when the buffalo are gone.”. . .

At exactly this point in Little Wolf’s address, President Grant’s wife, Julia, fainted dead away. . .

Official response to Little Wolf’s unusual treaty offer was swift. . . .Little Wolf and his entourage were packed inside a cattle car and escorted by armed guard out of the nation’s capital. . . In private and after the initial uproar had abated, the President and his advisors had to admit that Little Wolf’s unprecedented plan for assimilation of the Cheyennes made a certain practical sense. . .

Thus was born the “Brides for Indians” (or “BFI” program, as its secret acronym became known. . . [I]n a series of highly secretive, top-level meetings on the subject, the administration decided, in age-old fashion, to take matters into its own hands-to launch[ed] its own covert matrimonial operation. . .by recruiting women out of jails, penitentiaries, debtors’ prisons, and mental institutions -offering full pardons or unconditional release, as the case might be, to those who agreed to sign on for the program. . .

The first trainload of white women bound for the northern Great Plains and their new lives as brides of the Cheyenne nation left Washington under a veil of total secrecy late one night the following spring, [in] early March 1875.

Title: One Thousand White Women
Author: Jim Fergus
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin | 1999
Hardcover: 496 pages
ISBN: 978-0312199432
Genre: Historical Fiction
Review Source: Personal Copy

 

Sequel: The Vengeance of Mothers (will be available September 12, 2017)

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The Underworld

The Underworld

by Kevin Canty

W. W. Norton | March 2017
Hardcover: 256 pages
ISBN: 978-0-3993293050
Genre: Historical Fiction / Mine Disaster
Review Source: ARC e-book from Edelweiss

★★★☆☆

Really happened…In 1972, a fire broke out underground at the Sunshine Mine in Kellogg, Idaho; 91 men died of carbon monoxide poisoning. The disaster had a devastating effect on Kellogg and the nearby communities in Idaho’s Silver Valley. People who were there still vividly remember the events of that day. Source: NPR

Tom Wilkerson and Ron Flory were found 8 days after the fire and were the only survivors. Their story inspired this work of fiction.

When I first saw the title, The Underworld, and read the publisher’s blurb I made a wrong assessment that the book was a fantasy or science fiction. Somehow my brain latched on to the words – “none of the characters that populate the Underworld ever lived. . .” and made the leap to subterranean creatures never before seen.

In reality, the novel, inspired by true events, describes a hardscrabble life in a Colorado company-owned silver mining town in 1972. The cast of characters is small, mainly the Wright family and a few others. All residents are trapped; landlocked geographically, handcuffed by poverty and controlled by tradition. The company owns everything from the homes to the homeowners.

The story opens with David Wright, a college freshman, traveling from Missoula, Montana back to his hometown of Silverton, Colorado to attend a friend’s wedding. David’s easy drive from Missoula on the multi-lane highway ends when it bumps up against the mighty Camel’s Hump. Symbolically, and literally in David’s case, he puts chains on himself and the car’s tires before heading up the narrow mountain road toward home. Toward a place that the unimaginable has happened.

The day expires on the two-lane. . . the chains make a jingly sound that reminds David of Christmas and he sighs remembering all that was lost, everything slipping into the past. He is driving into the past. . .He moves through a whirling tunnel of snow, back and back and back.

From the moment you are born your life is predetermined here.  If you are a woman, you will become a miner’s wife. If you are a miner, your son will be a miner and together you will descend daily into hell praying the mountain will spit you back out at the end of your shift.

There are few secrets in a mining town; much like Cheers, everyone knows your name. You develop deep bonds and friendships as everyone knows that one day, something is going to happen that will forever change things. The underworld. That cramped, damp, hot darkness of the mine fills all their lives; young and old alike.

Fear, the frayed high tension wire that connects everyone above ground as well as those a mile below hums in their consciousness day and night. It colors everything they think and do. Could today’s kiss good-bye in the morning be the last kiss? They drown their fear in alcohol and bravado.  Most try to live loudly but there are those who withdraw into themselves creating a blank space where they smother feeling and emotion. They love, they hate, they fight, they pray…always aware they live on borrowed time.

It is no surprise that many dream of leaving but few have the courage to climb that mountain; it’s too scary to leave the devil you know for the one you don’t. Those that do leave are often pulled back by the bonds of family and the inability to understand and function in an uncontrolled outside world.

Then one day, it happens. . . 171 miners kissed their loved ones good-bye and headed to their underworld jobs. Life above ground followed normal routines. The instant the alarm was heard throughout the town, time stopped. The town’s worst nightmare had become a reality. Family and friends gather silently at the entrance of the mine and the long vigil begins. From that moment on, life will never be the same again in Silverton.

The fire will kill 91.

Whatever anyone thought they knew about themselves and how they would react to a mine disaster would prove to be wrong, Some will find the strength to start over, others will remain fixed in grief unable to restart a new life. This unfortunate town lost more than 91 souls, it lost its identity, its future. Somewhere, however, seeds of hope sprout for those willing to look for them.

In the difficult struggle to rise up, love will bloom and new friendships will be forged.  Those finding the will to change have a bright new future ahead. Others, will remain focused on the loss and become alienated, bitter and unable to rise from the ashes.

I found this book a fast read. I guess I was drawn into the story by virtue of  hearing about the local mine disaster near my home as a child. The story itself was told in simple terms, nothing floral or poetic, just told things in a manner that conveyed things as they probably would happen in real life.

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