One Thousand White Women

One Thousand
White Women:

The Journals of May Dodd

Jim Fergus, Author

Rated: ★★★★★

I’ve been hooked from childhood on fiction and non-fiction survival stories after reading Last of the Mohigans by James Fenimore Cooper.

I knew almost immediately that One Thousand White Women would be a book that I would read and reread. It is harsh, heartbreaking, and cruel yet depicts loyalty, friendship, love and strength of character. It reveals the truth that all cultures have good and bad elements capable of extreme behaviors and actions in the interest of their individual survival.

I highly recommend reading One Thousand White Women if you enjoyed the book and/or movie of Dances with Wolves.

The author states, “In spite of efforts to convince the reader to the contrary, this book is entirely a work of fiction. [T}he seed. . . was sown in author’s imagination by an actual historical event: in 1854 at a peace conference. . . a Northern Cheyenne chief requested. . .the gift of one thousand white women as brides for his young warriors.” [T]he request collapsed the peace conference, , , and the brides were not sent. In this novel, the brides were sent.

May Dodd was incarcerated by her parents in a mental institution for the crime of bearing two illegitimate children and loving a man far beneath her station in life . Escaping the horrors of the institution, May joins in the first convoy of brides and begins documenting her new life in a journal with the hopes that her estranged children “might one day know the truth of my unjust incarcertation, my escape from Hell, and into whatever is to come in these pages.”

I am currently reading an advanced copy of The Vengeance of Mothers, a sequel to One Thousand White Women, that will be available in September of 2017.

In September of 1874, the great Cheyenne “Sweet Medicine Chief” Little Wolf made the long overland journey to Washington, D.C., with a delegation of his tribesmen for the express purpose of making a lasting peace with the whites. . . The Indian leader was received in Washington with all the pomp and circumstance accorded to the visiting head of state of a foreign land.

At a formal ceremony in the Capitol building with President Ulysses S. Grant, and members of a specially appointed congressional commission, Little Wolf was presented with the Presidential Peace Medal. . . Expressing himself through an interpreter. . .Little Wolf came directly to the point.

“It is the Cheyenne way that all children who enter this world belong to their mother’s tribe. .  . The Cheyennes  are a small tribe, we have never been numerous because we understand that the earth can only carry a certain number of the People. . . . Because of the sickness you have brought us . . .and the war you have waged upon us, we are now even fewer. Soon the People will disappear altogether, as the buffalo in our country disappear.

“I am the Sweet Medicine Chief. My duty is to see that my People survive. To do this we must enter the white man’s world-our children must become members of your tribe. Therefore we ask the Great Father for the gift of one thousand white women as wives, to teach us and our children the new life that must be lived when the buffalo are gone.”. . .

At exactly this point in Little Wolf’s address, President Grant’s wife, Julia, fainted dead away. . .

Official response to Little Wolf’s unusual treaty offer was swift. . . .Little Wolf and his entourage were packed inside a cattle car and escorted by armed guard out of the nation’s capital. . . In private and after the initial uproar had abated, the President and his advisors had to admit that Little Wolf’s unprecedented plan for assimilation of the Cheyennes made a certain practical sense. . .

Thus was born the “Brides for Indians” (or “BFI” program, as its secret acronym became known. . . [I]n a series of highly secretive, top-level meetings on the subject, the administration decided, in age-old fashion, to take matters into its own hands-to launch[ed] its own covert matrimonial operation. . .by recruiting women out of jails, penitentiaries, debtors’ prisons, and mental institutions -offering full pardons or unconditional release, as the case might be, to those who agreed to sign on for the program. . .

The first trainload of white women bound for the northern Great Plains and their new lives as brides of the Cheyenne nation left Washington under a veil of total secrecy late one night the following spring, [in] early March 1875.

Title: One Thousand White Women
Author: Jim Fergus
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin | 1999
Hardcover: 496 pages
ISBN: 978-0312199432
Genre: Historical Fiction
Review Source: Personal Copy

 

Sequel: The Vengeance of Mothers (will be available September 12, 2017)

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