Ban This Book

 

BAN THIS BOOK

by ALAN GRATZ

It all started the day my favorite book went missing from the [school] library. I didn’t know it was missing. Not yet.

Publisher: Starscape/Tom Doherty
Pub Date: Aug 29, 2017

Hardcover: 256 pages
ISBN: 978-0-7653-8556-7
Genre: Juvenile Fiction (Ages 9-11)
Problem Solving/Censorship
Review Source: ARC e-book from Edelweiss

★★★★☆

ALAN GRATZ is a New York Times bestselling author of a number of novels for young readers. This newest book, BAN THIS BOOK introduces young (and older readers) to award winning books that have been challenged or banned in libraries. The book will be released in time for the 2017 American Library Association’s Banned Books Week slated for September 24 – 30.

BAN THIS BOOK opens with the 9 year-old avid library lover, Amy Anne, racing to her school library to check-out her favorite book for the umpteenth time. This day, Amy Anne discovers the book, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler is not on the shelf. 

After a complaint by a concerned parent about the moral messages several books in the library teach readers, the local library board skips protocol and has ordered the books, including From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, removed from the library shelf. The library board will hear public comment about the pros and cons of permanently banning the books at their next meeting.

But – it isn’t inappropriate! . . . It’s a great book! It is my favorite book!

I know, [says the school librarian]. . .Nobody but your parents has the right to tell you what books you can and can’t read. I promise you, I’m going to fight this. . .You can help get it back, Amy Anne. . . .[Tell the library board] why you like that book so much. . .

Amy, a shy and reluctant public speaker, attends the board meeting but fails to summon the courage to speak up.

The librarian reminded the library board they had approved the Request for Reconsideration form and specific procedures for considering the merits of a book but they chose to sidestep the rules. The highly influential community matron’s highly emotional speech won the day.

Amy Anne take matters into her own hands and begins an underground effort to keep the books available to other students. She is caught and suspended from school for three days. The librarian, having had no part in the deception, was fired. Mrs. Spenser, emboldened, goes on a rampage stripping more books off the library shelves.

Mrs. Spenser’s own son devises a way to outsmart his mother and to show the library board the need to follow rules. It takes bravery and courage on the part of all the students to pull it off. As expected, all ends well.

There are many lessons  for children here. Reading exposes situations in a non-threatening way that prepares their own life crisis as they grow up.  They learn that even adults break rules but that rules are necessary and failing to follow them have consequences. Amy Anne shows that finding your own voice and standing up to what you believe in is important. And most importantly, free speech is a guaranteed by the First Amendment and no one but your parents should have the right to stop you from reading something.

Recommended.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s