Tag Archives: China

Finding GOBI

Exerpt from ESPN interview By Ericka N. Goodman-Hughey | Mar 23, 2017

 I was at the base of the Tian Shan mountain range in northwest China [on a] seven-day 155-mile [ultra-marathon] race in June of 2016. I looked down for one last check of my shoes, and there was a scruffy puppy with the most adorable big brown eyes starting right back at me. . . [A]s soon as the gun went off, the dog ran with me, right at my heels.

First things first. What is an ultra-marathon? Technically, it is any foot race that exceeds the standard marathon length of 26.219 miles. After reading Finding Gobi, I learned that there are people in this world who want to run  50 to 100 miles in a day and then do it again the next day and the day after that! I think that running a simple marathon is nuts; but each to his own. What can I say. I have walked 2000+ miles on the Appalachian Trail and people think I am crazy.

The Gobi March, one of the most difficult ultra-marathon courses, is an annual race crossing the Gobi Desert. In 2016, it was held in the Xinjiang Province of China. Self-supported runners, carrying everything they will need for the entire race, run a marathon a day for four days. The 155-mile course is no road race. The Gobi March traverses grassland, mountains, river beds, rocky terrains, river crossings, and, of course, the Gobi Desert. The terrain is complemented with daily temperature extremes ranging from freezing to extreme heat.

Standing at the starting line on that June day in 2016, Dion Leonard’s only thoughts were the race day, his competitors and his backpack filled with his water, food, and anything else he would need in the next seven days to combat the heat and cold.

In those closing seconds before the starting gun sounded, Leonard wasn’t expecting to look down and see a dog standing there looking up at him. When the race began, Leonard was even more astonished that the little dog took off with him and would eventually ran nearly 90 miles right along side him.

In the year, 2016, the news of the world was filled with the Brexit Referendum, the US Presidential Election, the deadly Zika Virus, and the Syrian Refuge Crisis; lighthearted and heart-warming stories were few and far between.  Therefore, it was not surprising that the story of a Chinese scruffy self-sufficient stray dog and a marathon runner crossing the Gobi Desert would brighten heavy hearts around the world. Even these many years later. My girlfriend, a dog lover, had followed the story in real time and when I told her that I had just finished reading a book about an amazing Chinese dog that fell in love with a marathon runner, her face lit up and she exclaimed, “Gobi!

Day after day, the mysterious stray would be at the starting line with eyes only for Dion Leonard. The littlest competitor ran circles around the super athletes on the course and livened their down-time flitting from one person to the next with charming attention extracting a free meal. Everyone knew there was something special happening.

When the race was over, Leonard faced an even bigger challenge. He had become so smitten with the little dog, he named Gobi, that he wanted to bring her home to the United Kingdom. The road from China to his UK home would be paved with many legal hurdles, heart-breaking tribulations, and was massively expensive in time, manpower, and of course, money.

Gobi, a native of the mountains, would be required to stay quarantined for a month in the care of total strangers in an area foreign to her, a city. Leonard returned home to prepare the complicatedly slow process of repatriating her. During that time, Gobi escaped, and her caretakers hid the fact, thus complicating the eventual search for her. She could be anywhere. With the help of strangers worldwide, Gobi was eventually found. Every lamppost and store front had a lost dog poster. When found, she was discovered to have suffered some painful injuries along the way. If the story of her recovery doesn’t affect you, you must have a heart of stone. It is at times emotionally painful but like any good “Cinderella” story, there is a happy ending.

I had a hard time rating the book and I struggled with the reason. I came to the conclusion that I really didn’t like the runner but loved the dog. Leonard had, in his words, a difficult childhood, and his perpetual need to bash his mother and blame his life-long acting-out misbehavior on her was a turn-off.

There was also something odd that this man would be, self-admittedly, driven by the need to better any challenger while disliking what ever the challenge was that would achieve this victory. This lifelong trait was abrasive as he told us time and again how much he really disliked running but found his need to simply be better than someone else at what ever he was doing the ultimate reward.

I will be the first to admit that there is hope for Dion Leonard and the key to his future more positive and healthy outlook on life was Gobi. Gobi must have seen how much Leonard needed a paradigm shift in his life. Through Gobi, the author learned to trust people, possibly for the first time. In the end, he found the world willing to help a stranger without strings or conditions.

Good read.

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Wangs vs. The World

wangs vs. the world netgalley

WANGS vs. The World

by Jade Chang

Houghton-Mifflin-Harcourt | Oct 2016
Paperback: 368 pages (978-0544734098)
Genre: Fiction/Asian American/Humor/Coming of Age

ARC: NETGALLEY in exchange for an unbiased review. 

 ★★★★

Charles Wang has always felt gypped.  Years ago the Communists confiscated his family’s ancestral lands and Charles lives with the belief that he was robbed of his birthright as a landed aristocrat.  His family was forced to join hordes of Chinese escapees to the island of Taiwan where his fmercedes sketchather built a grim little factory that supplied urea to fertilizer manufacturers.  His disgraced father had been reduced to a dealing in pee.  “Not even real honest piss – artificial piss.  Faux pee.  A nitrogen-carrying ammonia substitute…

Sure that he could regain his family’s fortune and status, Charles headed to the United States to sell faux pee to American fertilizer manufacturers.  Airsick and relegated to the in-flight restroom, Charles practices his English reading the label of a mini-bar of soap and makes a monumental discovery…urea is an ingredient in this sweet smelling soap.

And with that discovery Charles was able to turn “Shit into Shinola” citing one of his favorite American movie phrases.  In fact he made two hundred million dollars worth of Shinola and became an American cosmetics tycoon.

Living the good life in sunny California set his initial purpose of restoring the family lands in China way back in a dusty corner of his mind. He had the money but he was having too much fun with it. So much fun that he let it distract his best business sense and when turned down for a loan to start a new cosmetic line he put his his entire fortune up as collateral… the Bel Aire house, the cigarette boat, the children’s trust funds.  Everything.

The new cosmetics line failed and at the same time America crashed headlong into the Great Recession of 2008. Overnight Charles lost it all.  And by extension his three children and his wife lost everything too.  And he did all this in secret from his family.

After shocking his spoiled and pampered wife, Barbra, with the news Charles packs a confused Barbra and his childhood nanny, Ama, into the only car available to him…the powder-blue 1980 Mercedes station wagon long ago sold to Ama.   Lights off on the old car they roll down the long driveway in the dead of night to avoid the embarrassment of discovery by their neighbors to begin a long arduous journey across the US to move in with their oldest daughter in her old farm house in rural New York State.

Along the way they will pick up the other two children both away at school. The children discover abruptly that their own world just collapsed; their lives reduced to fast food restaurants and sleazy hotel rooms as they travel cross country.

And this is where the story gets crazy. Anyone who has ever taken a family vacation stuffed in a station wagon with all their squabbles and perceived injustices can relate. As the reality of their sudden drop in social standing hits them, they all work their way through the emotions of loss and the realization that their future will be far different from their recent past.

Bumping along in the old car, we watch, look and listen as we are taken back to Taiwan, disco lounge or college dorm flipping around the past and present of each character.  Slowly each character changes, often subtly, until this family discovers the heart is the true source of riches.

The book was hyped as hysterically funny.  Nada.  But I did smile often and found it entertaining.  Sometimes I wanted to reach over and step on the gas to speed things up a bit. At times Charles was so shallow and narcissistic I was turned off.  Barbra, playing the role of the unloved step-mother, discovers her softer side.

When an unexpected event turns the road trip into something much more serious, I was surprised. Talk about a knock up side of the head to realign your priorities. And the final chapters were very engaging leaving me sad and hopeful at the same time.

I couldn’t help but think that this was a nice read but would make a great movie.  So read the book, it will be out in October 2016.  I am willing to bet you will see it screen soon after that!

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Wild By Nature

An advance reader copy was provided free of charge by Thomas Dunne
Books through NetGalley
in exchange for my honest opinion.

Wild By Nature

“Why do I Walk?”

Wild By Nature: From Siberia To Australia, Three Years Alone In The Wilderness On Foot

by Sarah Marquis
Thomas Dunne Books, 2016
ARC e-Reader (978-1-250-08199-5)
Hardcover: 272 pages (978-1-250-08197-1)
Genre: Memoir/Autobiography

★★★

Wild by Nature was hard for me to review as I saw it from two perspectives; librarian and backpacker.  I am an outdoorswoman and long distance backpacker myself; certainly nowhere near the explorer level as Sarah. When I saw this prepublication announcement I did cartwheels to get my hands on an ARC copy and was rewarded by Thomas Dunne Books.

First let me applaud Sarah for her incredible treks around the globe. This woman is a walking machine and makes Thoreau’s time at Walden Pond look like a trip to Central Park. She demonstrates an inordinate amount of stamina, versatility, adaptability, and perseverance.

Surprisingly the story is not presented as a journal or diary. It felt rambling and disconnected much like the internal strife the author shares with the reader.  She tosses in references to other treks that she has accomplished that feel distracting.

There are frequent references to self-discovery and her search for the meaning of life.  Overall the book will appeal to readers interested in a woman determined to take control of her own life on her own terms.  Her dedication reads, “The story that follows is my story. I dedicate it to all of the women throughout the world who still fight for their freedom and to those who have gained it, but don’t use it.”

Her 3-year trek from Siberia to Australia would have required tremendous advance work and logistics planning. How does a French-speaking Swiss single woman plan a multiyear expedition across six countries in the Middle East? Alone!

Sad to say the book doesn’t really tell you those intricate details. If you were reading and sneezed you might have missed the half page of dialogue on this topic.

Long distance foot travelers reading this story will be interested in her equipment choices, food stores and geographic guidance methods.  I was alarmed to note her low level of concern in all these matters.  She points out the problem reading Asia road maps, “I forge ahead blindly, without a topo[logical] map…I can’t really find where I am on my [road] maps…I like being in the dark, not knowing how many miles I am from the next village, the next water source.” Experienced trekkers do develop excellent guidance skills but they are still at the mercy of the unknown.

Provisioning for adequate nutrition is difficult on a trek.  Sarah is a strict vegetarian and cites resupplies opportunities limited to rice, onions, garlic, oil and hard cookies.  You can’t march long on white rice and hot tea.  It would have been interesting to learn more about her meal planning.

The story jumps and jerks through time and distance.  It was impossible to follow in your mind’s eye was she was facing and what she would be facing next. I never felt as though I was traveling with her; I never felt connected to her journey.

There were moments of very beautiful descriptions of terrain and examples of good, bad and indifferent interactions with the cultural natives. I have told you how I was personally affected by the story.  Other readers will come to the book with a different perspective and find the story completely different.

I am just disappointed in this so-so coverage of an awe inspiring journey by an extraordinary woman.  I yearned to learn more about everything in deeper detail. It doesn’t feel worthy of her blood, sweat and tears.

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