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Artemis: A Novel

ARTEMIS

by ANDY WEIR

 

Published:
Nov 14, 2017

Crown Publishing Group
Hardcover, 384 pages
ISBN: 978-0553448122

Review Source:
ARC from Edelewiss and Crown Publishing

★★★★☆

I live in Artemis, the first (and so far, only) city on the moon.  It’s made of five huge spheres called “bubbles.” . . . Artemis looks exactly like old sci-fi books said a moon city should look. . .It’s pricey to get here and expensive as hell to live here. But a city can’t just be rich tourists. . . It needs working-class people too. . . I’m one of the little people.

Jasmine Bashara (Jazz)
Porter and Part-Time Contreband Smuggler

Andy Weir’s The Martian and Matt Damon’s depiction in the movie makes it a hard first book to top! As I prepared to write my thoughts about the newest book, Artemis, I came across an interview with the author that matched my sentiments about the two books.

[Artemis] is my second book. . . It’s likely that The Martian is going to be the most successful book I ever write. . . If [readers say Artemisis not as good as The Martian, but it’s a good book. I’ll call that a win.

The Martian focused on the science of traveling to and living on Mars. Artemis is loaded with science but it primarily focuses on life in the vacuum of space and the richness of the mineral deposits on the moon.

Unlike Mark Watney’s status as the sole inhabitant on Mars, Jazz Bashara, our main protagonist, is a permanent resident of Artemis, the moon’s first city with a current population of 2000. As a low level employee working as a porter (delivery girl), Jazz aspires to become  an EVA trained tour guide for outside the domed city. Don’t ask me what EVA stands for…I couldn’t find the answer but it is obvious that it implies equipment necessary to sustain life outside the oxygenated city.

Artemis, the city, is much like any Earth city: upper class living with access to casinos and upscale hotels, suburbs with shopping centers, recreational sports and theaters, poor district with slum housing and low-paid worker bees. Crime, drugs and a laissez-faire view of whorehouses and sexual activity has been encouraged by the local organized crime syndicate. The city is a mecca for  tourists but the resources and low-gravity setting on the moon is the real reason for it’s success. The biggest money maker is the Sanchez Aluminum operation.

Jazz and her father moved to Artemis when she was six years-old. Her father is a master craftsman specializing in welding; a skill in big demand in the city.  When you live in a welding shop, the lingo and skills become part of your daily life and Jazz is a talented welder in her own right. She was more than a handful in her teen years leading to a break in their relationship. Those rebellious years have stymied her future now that she is in her mid-20s.

Lying to Dad transported me back to my teen years. And let me tell you: there’s no one I hate more than teenage Jazz Bashara. That stupid bitch made every bad decision a stupid bitch could make. She’s responsible for where I am today.

Part of her left-overs from her delinquent years are routine run-ins with Rudy DuBois, Artemis’s head of security. Rudy quit the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to become “what passes for law in town”. He still  wears his Dudley Do-Right uniform but he is anything but a bumble-foot. Rudy is sharp, smart and tough.

If you commit a serious crime, we exile you to Earth. For everything else, there’s Rudy.

These days, Rudy is trying to nab Jazz when she delivers smuggled contraband. She has an extremely efficient smuggling operation going with a friend back on Earth. Nothing really naughty…simple things like cigars, lighters – anything flammable. Flames and oxygen are not compatable.

Out of the blue she receives an offer for a major job that would solve all her financial problems but could get her expelled to Earth. Accepting the challenge leads to exponentially larger problems that threaten not only her family but the city.

The remaining cast of characters, unlike The Martian with Mark Watney’s solo act, provide tension, humor, love, friendship, fisticuffs, terror, and randy dialogue.

Thoughts

I had a hard time liking Jazz.  Her behavior seemed very immature and reminded me more of Gavorche, the street urchin in Les Miserables than a mature adult. It seemed to conflict with her well developed problem solving skills and her talents in improvisation. What was quirky and funny on Mark Watney was less fun on Jazz Bashara.

On a positive note, there were moments when Jazz showed that beneath the baudy banter was a caring soul. She was especially kind when dealing with a troubled teenager.

The science and technology aspects of the story were well researched and rang true to this space novice. I wished I could  tour  old moon landing sites pedaling in my own oxygen inflated “hamster ball”.

Would I read another Andy Weir novel? You betcha! But I sure hope it has nothing to do with welding and chemistry. I learned all I would ever need to know from Jazz.

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The Salt Line

THE SALT LINE

by HOLLY GODDARD JONES

G.P. Putnam’s Sons | Sept 2017
Hardcover: 394 pages
ISBN: 978-0735214316
Genre: DYSTOPIAN FICTION
Review Source: ARC e-book from Netgalley and

★★★☆☆

Decades ago, a particularly virulent tick invaded the United States causing a nation-wide epidemic that divided the Old Republic into factions deeper than the Civil War. Most of the survivors retreated behind quarantined barriers in several geographically defined Zones. Each of these  zones devised some method of limiting tick infestations; some more successfully than others. The most secure and safe zone is the Atlantic Zone; rich in resources and power left over from the Old Republic – safe behind the “Salt Line” – a chemically burned area extending several kilometers beyond the guarded perimeter “Wall.”

“A pregnant miner tick releases a numbing agent, which allows her to work without detection. By the time you feel the itching, [she] has settled in place, laid her eggs and died. In a matter of hours the ticks spread through the body, mature and erupt through the skin creating an unbearable itch. The bites can be survived but 45% of female miner ticks carry Shreve’s disease that spreads rapidly, causes total paralysis and death in a matter of days.”

– OLE Training Course

The pervasive  miner ticks are bit players here. Their lethal presence a source of existential anxiety. They are pawns in a much greater threat – domination and greed by the seedier side of human nature.

Four years ago, a private enterprise, Outer Limits Excursions (OLE), began offering expensive three-week guided trips into the Out-Of-Zone. Some of  their clients are enticed by stories of the purple mountains majesty and the abandoned history and culture of the past. Others are seeking the nefarious pleasures unobtainable in the highly regulated Atlantic zone but provided by the Out-Of-Zoners – free spirits choosing to live free of rules and regulations and chancing Shreve’s in the castoff world.

For personal safety, OLE excursions require each client to undergo a regimented three-week training program in survival skills. When ready, they will leave the Zone in a protective SecondSkin microsuit, -given a “Stamp”, an intense burner much like an old fashioned car cigarette lighter used to fry embedded ticks – and assigned a partner who must stay as close as a conjoined twin.

It’s September and the OLE brochure promises a once-in-a-lifetime view of the mountains in colorful foliage and visits to the remnants of the Old Republic way of life. The training is over – the van  has pulled away from the Salt Line – the emptiness- the vast isolation ahead overwhelms them.

Among the 12 clients are a popular jazz musician and his girlfriend, a young techno entrepreneur, and a middle-aged housewife; each with a hidden agenda and a specific purpose for being there other than viewing the scenery.

At this point background stories of key characters have been defined. The clients have been  together for three weeks  and  have established friendships – or at least allies – and enemies among themselves.

A couple of days into the adventure the startled passengers are kidnapped at gunpoint by their guide and force marched to a rustic commune in the Blue Ridge Mountains known as Ruby City. What looked like a three-week sightseeing tour now has turned violent – one of the passengers was shot – two have had been bitten by miner tics – and the future of the remaining passengers looks ominous.

field of poppies.jpgJune proceeded to shake the hand of each of her captives. . . When Marta’s turn came . . . [June] fixed her hazel eyes on Marta’s demanding contact. ‘You look tired’, she said. ‘That trek is a bit much for women our age. I do apologize.’

‘The trek was fine’, Marta managed to say.  ‘The treatment we received wasn’t’

‘I’m afraid that prisoners of war don’t often get the red carpet rolled out.’
‘What war?’, Marta asked.

Buckle up . . . things are about to take off. And no one is who they seem. And no one’s future is guaranteed.

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